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20120925
20121003
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
moving and revealing than as the secret witness to the struggle for civil rights. the great moral issue tearing the country apart. and after a young man named james meredith creates a crisis by enrolling in the all-white university of mississippi. >> mr. president, please, why don't you, can't you give an order. >> how can i remove him, governor, when there's a riot in the streets. >> i took an oath. >> the problem, is governor, i've got my responsibilities just like you have yours. >> reporter: kennedy sent in the u.s. marshals and the national guard to restore order, and james meredith became the first black graduate of ole miss. then 11 days before he is assassinated -- >> tuesday, november 12th. >> the last words on the last tape are about the hard battle ahead. >> and so our lot becomes more difficult. >> our lot becomes more difficult. and that's it. last word. >> i love that. i think that's really -- i thought that was really moving. and obviously, knowing what happened. he understood how difficult all of this really was. >> wow. >> just fascinating stuff. 260 hours worth of the
presidents do. on civil rights, especially, there was a lot of movement from 1962, when the tapes start to 1963. it was all changing. the white house had swung very much behind the civil rights movement in the fall of 1963. >> he was very involved in the minut minutia, like our other boss, president clinton. >> exactly. incredible moment in august 28th, 1963, the great martin luther king speech "i have a dream" had just happened and they had a political strategy session where president kennedy went through all the members of the house and senate and what he thought their likelihood was to support civil rights. it was clear, he was on their side, driving it forward. >> there's a little clip that exposes a personal side of the president as well. let's play that. >> i wanted to do back to jordan marsh. >> all right, sir. i want that follow's incompetent who had his picture taken in next to mrs. kennedy's bed. he is a silly bastard. i wouldn't have him running a cat house. >> he is furious over a $5,000 bill for a hospital room, right? sn>> a timely expenditure built for a legitimate reason
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegrated the armed wt tr. appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could havebeen, but he did ts poant. w >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a ar great president? or a great president? think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created --n 1952, 3,it cle,think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if he had been really intent on rolling back the new deal and the fair deal, it would ve been a huge fight and would h
civil rights. when you define liberal and conservative, people support medicare with all their hearts and they do like this stuff, they like that we have a mixed capitalism with some social welfare mixed in to soften it and that makes them practical people and makes them liberal in a sense of functionality but not, i'm a liberal. your thoughts? >> you know, i agree. chris, two things have happened over the course of the last 20, 30 years. you have this slow turning away from the ideas of the new deal, at least from other people. the notions that these are ha handouts when it applies to other people, just by default, any democratic that gets elected, it was illegitimate. and then clinton comes along, he's ichlt llegit. >> he did win and i would think that there was this notion that bill clinton was inherently illegitimate and nothing too extreme to dislodge him from the white house because he was de-facto illegitimate. and i think with barack obama, this notion that this could not have happened. this was a nightmare inflicted on us by a.c.o.r.n. >> you are so funny. you have the cartoo
is cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: it is a scene that played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enacted by republican controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos, groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there is no fraud in our elections, but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly exclude thousands or hundreds of thousands of eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws protect only against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing state, lawyers for both sides admit no known cases of in person fraud. still, it is a problem says conservative columnist john fund, an expert on the subj
. so many women spent lives to make sure i have a political voice and same thing in the civil rights movement. so many people fought so i could express my views and vote and have a say. i never want to take that for granted. not as a celebrity but as an american. >> we just showed the brief clip of you speaking at the convention. >> i was really nervous. i get paid to be other people for a living. to speak as other people. as the convention i was speaking as myself in a room that big and the stakes are so high in this election. i felt like it was a tremendous honor and a big responsibility. i kind of prefer being other people. >> that's an incredible room. energy in there. you get off one line and you feel the energy come back to you and it kind of builds. >> really exciting. >> i think we have a clip of you speaking. let's listen. >> today there are people out there trying to take away rights that our mothers, our grandmothers and our great grandmothers fought for. rights that we fought for. our right to vote. our right to choose. our right to affordable, quality education. equal pa
in the history of the modern church because it has set up a 1i68 court. it's a civil court which is also opened up to the public. >> father gall when the butler was arrested, he told investigators that this could be a healthy thing to bring the church back on the right track. was he in any sense right? >> it seems that the butler was trying in some way to help the pope. in fact, the information that was revealed through the documents that the butler stole is in no way incriminating of the pope himself. in fact, the pope comes off as very kind and gentle throughout all those documents. it doesn't make sense what the butler is claiming. that's one of the things they want, to ascertain the fullness of the truth which is what the pope wants. >> we're expecting a pardon from the pope ultimately. why? >> perhaps. the pope hasn't given any indication he will pardon him. he has indicated his great affection for paulo gab iele. the entire family lives in the vatican and are citizens of the vatican city state. nonetheless, i'm sure the pope wants to first determine that he has fully revealed the truth as
attacks in syria. you can see a bomb go off right here, near military headquarters. wednesday, the deadliest day so far in the civil war which has claimed an estimated 30,000 lives. >>> here at home, thousands the of criminal cases have been thrown into question this massachusetts this morning, after a chemist at the state's drug lab, admitted she faked lab results. ignoring procedures, forging signatures when working on more than 34,000 cases. some defendants have already been freed or had their sentences disspended. >>> a terrifying ordeal for a manager at carl's jr. after taking time off to recover, she was fired from her job. carl's jr. is not saying why. and some new developments in the decades-old search for teamsters' boss, jimmy hoffa. police in detroit have received a new trip that hoffa is buried under the driveway you see there. they're now taking soil samples. thousands of tips have come in when hoffa vanished in 1975. >>> finally, the prime minister of great britain, perhaps a little embarrassed this morning. he was on david letterman last night. got a pop quiz on
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)